by Jeff K. Ward

Family-oriented web-app geek entrepreneur father & husband. Founder at ContentGems, Animikii & YikeSite. Makin’ babies since 2005.

Read this first

Start Your Day Right When You Work From Home

When I first started working from home I found that I’d wake up and get stuck into work right away before even grabbing something to eat let alone getting dressed. It would be 11 or 12 until I hopped in the shower, got dressed and felt like a real human being.

After a while it just felt like the days (mornings especially) dragged on and on and I discovered that I just needed that shower to hit my “reset” button and go at it for another day.

After a few years of doing this I learned that choosing the right clothes became very important. Instead of having a shower and throwing on a sweet tracksuit, I found that I needed to take my self seriously. For me this meant jeans and a button-up shirt. Combing my hair also makes a big difference too.

A lot of work-from-home entrepreneurs tend to bust out their mobile device or laptop while they’re still in bed and get stuck there all morning. As

Continue reading →

Startup Parents: You Are Not Alone

If you think most startup founders are single, kidless, and in their 20s, you would be wrong. In fact, the majority of new entrepreneurs already have kids and are married when they start their first company. It’s just that nobody talks about it.

The Kauffman foundation for entrepreneurship found that the average age of company founders was 40 with over 69% being married and over 59% having at least one kid when they started their first business.


To the startup parents out there, I know this may have come as a shock.

I used to think I was a member of a secret group of super hero startup parents. I launched my first SaaS web-app in 2007, when my son was barely a year old, and struggled to build a business while at the same time supporting my young family. Nobody talked about business and family life and there were no obvious examples of successful startup mommies and daddies out

Continue reading →

Are you actually your first customer? Then prove it.

I’m a huge believer in the “what would I pay for this” approach to pricing your product. I want to build products that I actually use myself. What would I pay? Well, that’s hypothetical though isn’t it? To take this approach a step further, how about: what am I paying?

Let’s take “hypothetical” out of the equation here. Hypothetically, I’d pay (and hope my customers might pay) $50 dollars. But actually I’ll pay $19.

You can try to ask potential customers what they would pay, but until you see a credit card, it all means nothing. As Jason Fried put it, “the only answers that matter are dollars spent”. It’s simple… if you are lucky enough to acquire a paying customer, that’s one vote in the “yes” column. You get to be the first vote in the “yes” column.

If you are building something that requires recurring payment, why not just bust out your own credit card and pay for your own product

Continue reading →

Best Place To Start A Company (If You Have Kids)

A few weeks before Robyn and I moved to Vancouver Island we were delighted by the wonderful (and unexpected) news that a baby was on the way. Our move to the island was for adventure, a better climate and to start the next chapter in our lives. But knowing we now had a baby coming really made us second guess our decision to move.


We had some family where we lived: my brother and his family, some cousins, and a great network of long-time friends. We would have been set as far as a sense of community goes.

We moved anyways. We were stupid.

I figured that I could grow my consulting company from anywhere but I didn’t factor in how much it was going to suck having a baby, in a new city, with no family around.

Then something amazing happened. Family moved here.

One of the great things about Vancouver Island is that it is stunningly beautiful and has the warmest climate in Canada which

Continue reading →